R A C H E L       L I L L I E

Staples Hill

Staples Hill

90 GBP
Staples Hill - 0
Staples Hill - 1
Staples Hill
90 GBP
Staples Hill, Epping Forest

Giclée Print

A2 (420x596cm)

Traditionally on 11th November on Staples Hill, the Loughton Loppers would rush to gather here in the belief that if they lopped a branch before midnight, their 'ancient right' to lop wood on 'common waste' would continue for the next year. This act eventually contributed to the Epping Forest Act of 1878, which saved the forest for the enjoyment of the people.
Deer Shelter Plain

Deer Shelter Plain

90 GBP
Deer Shelter Plain - 0
Deer Shelter Plain - 1
Deer Shelter Plain
90 GBP
Deer Shelter Plain, Epping Forest

Giclée Print

A2 (420x596cm)

Once stood a large conical thatched deer shelter on the southern edge of the heather filled plain, where root vegetable and hay were left to feed the forest deer. During the 1940's a bush fire destroyed it and so the structure and its function became memorialised in the name of the area. Today the area is a plain of beautiful grasses, scattered with old beech pollards, young birch and areas of struggling heather and ferns.
Pizzle Pits

Pizzle Pits

90 GBP
Pizzle Pits - 0
Pizzle Pits - 1
Pizzle Pits
90 GBP
Pizzle Pits, Epping Forest

Giclée Print

A2 (420x596cm)

When the water level is low, Pizzle Pits can be a small complex of water filled pits or after heavy rain the appearance of one pond. Although their origin is uncertain, they most probably date from the 19th Century as gravel pits. Many areas in Epping Forest were former gravel pits, used for the construction of new roads at the turn of the century. 
Long Running

Long Running

90 GBP
Long Running - 0
Long Running - 1
Long Running
90 GBP
Long Running, Epping Forest

Giclée Print

A2 (420x596cm)

Edward North Buxton in 1885 described Long Running as 'an open heathery plain formerly bare of trees, owing to forest fires; at least until recently, but now countless young birches give it a pale green cast in the summer.' Now many of the birches are being managed to allow for ground heather to grow again. This scene depicts a small but deep pond in the centre of Long Running which developed from a large WWII bomb crater. 
North Weald Redoubt

North Weald Redoubt

90 GBP
North Weald Redoubt - 0
North Weald Redoubt - 1
North Weald Redoubt
90 GBP
North Weald Redoubt, Epping Forest

Giclée Print

A2 (420x596cm)

North Weald Redoubt, located on the fringes of Epping was a mobilisation centre constructed as part of the London Defence Scheme between 1889 and 1903. It's function was as a store for ammunition and weapons, however its location was given away as it was positioned on a high point of land. In 1920 the Marconi Co purchased the land and it became the site of Ongar Radio Station. During world war II because of the importance of radio and communications, special VP troops were stationed there. Today, it is private land with no sign of any development, with the main redoubt flooded and signs of much vandalism. Remains of a large section of radio mast lies on the ground.
Chingford Plain

Chingford Plain

90 GBP
Chingford Plain - 0
Chingford Plain - 1
Chingford Plain
90 GBP
Chingford Plain, Epping Forest

Giclée Print

A2 (420x596cm)

This view across Chingford Plain looks out from The Queen Elizabeth Hunting Lodge on Dannet Hill. The lodge was built by Henry VIII and originally called The Great Standing to view 'the royal hunts' across part of his Great Deer Park.  In the 18th and early 19th century, it was the starting place of the 'Epping Hunt', you can see a clear path into Bury Wood where horses and hounds would gallop in hunt of fallow deer. Blackthorn bushes, oaks and small beech trees are scattered around the plain today.
Ambresbury Banks

Ambresbury Banks

90 GBP
Ambresbury Banks - 0
Ambresbury Banks - 1
Ambresbury Banks
90 GBP
Ambresbury Banks, Epping Forest

Giclée print

A2 (420x594cm)

Ambresbury Banks is the site of an iron age hill fort in Epping Forest. Fragments of iron age pottery have been found there and legend has it that it was the camp of the Iceni Queen Boadicea (though there is no evidence to support this). Today you can see the camp's ancient beech trees enclosed by the great high banks of the camp.

The Impossibility of the Journey

The Impossibility of the Journey

20 GBP
The Impossibility of the Journey - 0
The Impossibility of the Journey - 1
The Impossibility of the Journey - 2
The Impossibility of the Journey
20 GBP
The Impossibility of the Journey

A 64 page 2 colour risographed book on
80gsm recycled paper

The book explores and questions the
idea of a journey, collating drawings,
photographs and written fragments
of text.

'It seems a pity not to write anymore,
but I think I'm runni n g    o u t    o f       t   i   m      e ."